not asking for permission

I shared an excerpt from Cheryl Strayed’s book Tiny Beautiful Things a few months ago and absolutely love Cheryl’s raw, honest and compassionate advice she gives readers. I recently read an The Millions interview with Cheryl and {of course} fell in love with her responses and thoughts on life, specifically about difficult situations and grief. She shares about just being human – and being completely okay with the mistakes, the ups and downs, the transitional periods. Here’s a few of my favorite parts from the interview – enjoy!

Like, what is the best or right-est thing to do in any given situation. And that can be really hard to do. Like, just to speak honestly to a friend or a parent or a lover. I experience those things as stressful and hard, too. And sometimes it’s easier to be kind of dysfunctional, or to allow a dysfunction to continue. The reason we use denial, for example, it’s a great survival mechanism. So many of us get into trouble with setting boundaries, have chosen not to set boundaries for our short-term survival or benefit. But ultimately that comes back and bites you in the ass.

So it’s up to us, it’s up to our generation, to just not ask for permission. I think that not asking for permission to be human is a really big part of being a fully actualized human. I think with all humility, you should be accountable to your actions. But also that, with that apology, be able to report what your actions were.

People do all kinds of unexpected things in these transitional times of their lives. And they don’t need to be sorry for it, because it is part of being human, and it isn’t about being a good person or a bad person. I think just telling the truth of that is kind of important and revolutionary.

One Comment

  1. Ah yes, I was so moved by her book. I’ve also read WILD and just love her. I have a post too with Cheryl’s quotes :) Love this.

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